Posted on

autoflowers flowering

How does the pH dictate the yields, you ask? Well, when the pH falls below 5.5, plants cannot absorb certain nutrients like Calcium and Magnesium even if they are present at the roots. The same logic applies when the pH rises above 7. Suffice it to say that all the nutrients in the world cannot help the plant recover if the pH is not right. With an imbalance in the pH, the nutrients cannot be absorbed and the plants produce very little yields. Therefore, check the pH constantly to ensure that the plants are healthy.

If you’re adamant on transplanting, though, make sure that the medium is exactly the same. For instance, if your seedling is growing in a potting mix of coco coir and compost, it should be transplanted to another container containing the exact same mix. Water the seedling container a few hours before transplanting to ensure that the soil is moist. There’s a high risk of hurting the roots when the soil is too dry or wet.

Due to a shortage of time, not every training technique working for other cannabis plants suit autoflowers. For instance, HST or High-Stress-Techniques work very well on photoperiod plants, but autoflowers prefer Low-Stress-Techniques or LST.

Most autoflowers start flowering in the third or fourth week, so start training only if the plants grow fast and remain healthy enough to be trained. If you’re unsure, it’s okay to not train the plants at all.

2) Don’t take the risk of transplanting

It’s also critical to transplant only after the roots have filled out in the container since the soil will drop off in clumps with the roots stuck to them. In other words, wait until the plant is a little root bound. Since there are so many conditions, it’s best to start directly in the final containers. With no disturbance, you’re all set to get great yields.

3) Choose containers that drain well

Pre-flowers are the first signs of a female plant and the stigmas will start to appear, looking like small white, fuzzy hair. This is actually what ends up as the brown hair wrapped around your dried buds, and is the start of life for bud production.

This happens because the calyxes are what protect the seeds which is how cannabis plants guarantee their next generation so if a plant has not been germinated and the calyxes are round and plump, it means the reproduction phase has ended and your plants are ready to finish their life cycle.

Week 6: Stigmas in abundance

As you may know by now, after 3-5 weeks your autoflower should be transitioning to the flowering stage but if the weeks go by and you don’t see any signs of stigmas (white hairs) there are a couple of things that could be causing this.

Apart from these two, cannabis plants also need micronutrients, these minerals are needed in much lower doses, and depending on the type of medium you’re growing in, you will have to provide them with products such as CalMag additives.

Depending on the genetics you’re growing, there will be a growth period of around 4-5 weeks, during this time your cannabis plants will focus on developing green matter such as roots, branches, foliage, and establishing itself structure-wise prior to flowering.

You can make your own potting mix using the following formula:

Their impressive resistance to pathogens and pests allows them to withstand the challenges of outdoor growing.

As the name suggests, autoflowering strains don’t require a change in the light cycle to enter the flowering stage. Many growers choose to keep their autoflowers on a light schedule of 18 hours on and 6 hours off during the entire growing cycle. Other cultivators choose to keep their lights on around the clock in hopes of maximising photosynthesis and growth rate, however, this can get quite expensive.

AUTOFLOWERING GROW GUIDE: HOW TO GROW AUTOFLOWERS WEEK BY WEEK

8 weeks, with subsequent weekly harvests when growing fast strains.

Autoflowering cannabis plants are hardy, fast, and easy to cultivate in confined spaces. What’s not to love? Learn how to grow them week by week below.

However, their yields aren’t as spectacular as those obtained from photoperiod giants, but, the trade-off for brevity makes the decision worthwhile for most growers.

Contents: