Best Soil For Cannabis Seeds

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Additives that will help you improve soil quality, resulting in better growth cannabis. What to consider when it comes to growing weed in organic soil. The best soil for cannabis plants depends on a variety of factors. Learn how to find or make the best soil for growing marijuana! Been trying to figure out what is the best soil for cannabis? Not sure where to start? Read on to learn more about different soils and what's right for you.

Best Soil For Cannabis – What is Good Soil For Growing Weed?

Signs of good and bad soil quality, other additives that help to improve soil quality and what to consider when it comes to planting this year.

  • 1. The benefits of organic soil
  • 1. a. Organic soil additives
  • 2. Other additives that improve soil quality
  • 2. a. Coco
  • 2. b. Biochar
  • 2. c. Perlite
  • 2. d. Vermiculite
  • 3. Signs of good soil
  • 4. Signs of bad soil
  • 5. How to make your own soil
  • 5. a. Best nutrients for soil
  • 5. b. Cheap mix for diy soil
  • 5. c. Best soil for beginners
  • 5. d. Ph too high or ph too low
  • 5. e. Best soil for marijuana
  • 6. In conclusion

When growing autoflowering Cannabis plants, it is very important to keep them supplied with nutrients in the form of hard foods, or liquid feeds. The best soil for autoflowers will depend on your environment, fertilizers, and ability to control the pH, so keep this in mind if this is your first grow cycle, knowing the best option in your case can really set you on your way to bountiful harvests.

So if you’re wondering what soil is best for growing weed, below we’ll explain what to know, the signs of good and bad soil quality, as well as what you should consider when it comes to planting this year.

1. The Benefits of Organic Soil

Soil for autoflowers or for any other type of cannabis plant consists of organic material that is in a permanent state of decomposition. Teaming with beneficial microorganisms that are responsible for converting nutrients to the plant’s roots, living soil is Mother Nature’s way of allowing autoflowering plants to work in a symbiotic relationship. As the tiny microorganisms decomposing the organic matter, they make the nutrients available for the roots, which are now able to access all the available nutrients and minerals found within the soil web. Once this symbiosis occurs, then the only real requirement is for the soil to be adequately watered. This is basically the most simple form of organic growing that is perfect for those new to growing, it requires very little maintenance, and labor, as well as allowing the grower to work with a slow buffering organic process, so if you were wondering what is the best soil for growing weed, read along.

Organic Soil Additives

Using organic soil additives or amendments will help increase the number of beneficial microorganisms, improve moisture retention, and help you control the health of your soil. In general, you should be looking at adding these amendments before planting. They will help you create the best organic environment for the root system to thrive, which will result in amazing growth and the full terpene profile maturing.

Bat Guano

Bat guano is one of the most widely used additives in cannabis cultivation. It is a fast-acting, highly bio-available organic fertilizer with high rates of nitrogen and phosphorus making it perfect for the vegetative growth stage. It also helps improve the drainage and oxygenation of the soil mix, helps boost the natural immunity against pests, fungal infestations, and disease, and can ensure the best possible terpene production (although there is little scientific evidence to back up this claim).

Be careful with the amount you introduce to the substrate, as bat guano is pretty strong stuff. A little goes a very long way.

It can be used in both its fresh or dry form and is typically sourced in either powder or pellet form. It can be used in many ways other than as a direct additive to the soil. Many cultivators used bat guano as a fertilizing tea, or as a foliar spray. It can also be used as a top dressing by sprinkling it directly around the base of the plant and then watered in. To make a super effective bat guano tea all you need is 15 grams of bat guano, 1 liter of lukewarm water, and an air pump. Mix the guano and the water together well, and make sure the water is only lukewarm. Hot water will kill the microbial life that you are trying to introduce to the mix. Give it all a good mix, throw the pump in and let it aerate for at least 24 hours. This tea can be supplied twice a week throughout the entire lifecycle of the crop.

Worm Castings

Worm casting, or worm poo, is literally the most bio-available organic fertilizer with ridiculous levels of both nutrients and minerals. Also referred to as vermicast, this top-shelf additive is perfect for any organic cannabis garden. It not only provides long-lasting, slow-release nutrition to the crop but also increases the aeration of the soil and provides excellent drainage.

You can swap out any potting mix you may use for 100% worm castings, and you do not have to worry about nutrient burn issues at all. Creating your own worm farm at home is super simple and can provide you with an unlimited supply of castings, ready to use at a moments notice, and provide your crop with almost everything it needs to provide you with bumper harvests.

Manure

Cow manure makes a perfect slow-release fertilizer. It usually contains a very well-balanced mix of the three main macronutrients that plants need for healthy and vigorous growth, plus manure works as a very efficient soil conditioner and helps increase the amount of microbial life in the soil, while also boosting moisture retention. Keep in mind that some manures may have herbicide contamination, so always check the packaging to ensure it is fully organic. If you live near a farm and can get it directly from the source then even better!

You want to mix the manure in before planting, and make sure there is no heavy rain forecast for the next week or so to prevent the chances of all the goodness being washed away. Chicken manure, on the other hand, is considered to be “hot” manure, meaning it can easily burn the plants if not allowed to sit and mature. In general, we do not recommend using chicken manure for your cannabis crop.

Bone Meal and Blood Meal

Bone meal is made from the ground-up bones of beef cattle and is a fantastic source of both phosphorus and calcium. It is used pretty extensively with outdoor cannabis cultivation but is not recommended for indoor growers. It does come with quite an acidic pH level which needs to be balanced, so keep that in mind. Blood meal is made from, you guessed it, the blood of beef cattle. It is very rich in bio-available nitrogen, but can also easily burn the plants if overused.

It too comes with quite an acidic pH level which must be balanced. Both of these additives can attract the attention of wild animals which can easily wreck the crop, so make sure any plants that use these amendments are well fenced off. It goes without saying that these additives are anything but vegan, so if that is important for you then choose other fertilizing options.

Kelp Meal

Kelp meal is one of the most desirable additives for cannabis crops, as it is packed full of over 65 different essential elements and minerals, and also contains a very healthy dose of potassium. Many growers are of the thinking that kelp meal provides a huge boost to the flavor and color range of cannabis, which we agree with.

Mycorrhizal Fungi

Every single cannabis crop, no matter the method or techniques applied, should have mycorrhizal fungi added. This type of fungi plays a very important role in helping the plant feed on the nutrients by turning them into a more bio-available source. They also help protect the root system from attack by pests, disease, and harmful fungi.

2. Other Additives That Improve Soil Quality

One of the downsides to using soil found in the ground is that it can be very dense once watered. Restricting root growth during the early stages of a Cannabis plant’s life is never advised, so adding other substrates into your living soil can be very advantageous.

By simply adding a 25-50% ratio of coco coir to your cannabis soil, the quality of the mix will become very airy and lightweight. Adding coco will enhance the air pockets present, the wicking action of the medium, as well as encourage a mass expansion in the rhizosphere. Coco is very user-friendly and is well associated with large yields. The best thing about adding coco is the fact it is an inert growing medium, so does not have any nutritional value in terms of Nitrogen, Phosphorus, or Potassium, including trace elements.

  • Increases aeration and holds water better: Due to its characteristics, coco fiber can increase aeration in the soil and can absorb up to 10x its own weight in water, making it vital for growers living in dry weather.
  • Cheap: Coco fiber is relatively cheap and comes in various forms. You can find it compressed into a brick or already washed and ready to use out the bag, the price may change a bit depending on your preference but it won’t be absurdly expensive.
  • Easy to use: Coco is a sterile medium so fungus and other bugs avoid it, making it perfect for growing cannabis. Also, because of its neutral pH, you can use it with soil amendments without worrying.
  • Sterile: Because this type of medium is sterile, it won’t contain any of the nutrients your plant needs, even though you can mix it with soil or even amend it, you will have to provide all the nutrients your plant needs if you’re only using coco.
  • Needs to be washed: The quality can vary from brand to brand, so depending on the brand, you will have to soak it and wash it a couple of times to remove impurities before using it.
  • Hard to find good quality: Even though it’s relatively easy to find coco coir, it can be hard to find good quality coco fiber. This doesn’t mean you can’t use it but you will have to wash it thoroughly and experiment with a couple of brands before you’re 100% satisfied.
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Biochar

An incredible organic addictive that has amazing water-holding capabilities, an enormous surface area, and is a source of pure carbon. Biochar is made by heating wood to such temperatures that the end result is a tiny, charcoal-black crystalline substrate. Due to the fact it is 100% carbon and has a shelf life of thousands of years, organic farmers use biochar with their soil to improve water retention allowing for less watering times, feeding the beneficial microorganisms a rich source of carbon, and helping save the planet.

Organic additives like Coco Coir and Biochar can drastically improve the quality of your soil, improve water retention and not to mention help you to save the planet.

  • Increases soil fertility: Biochar can boost soil fertility when used in combination with amended soil because it prevents nutrients from leaking out and provides carbon which increases the availability of nutrients in the medium.
  • Holds nutrients and moisture: Thanks to its porous surface, biochar can absorb a lot of water and draws in minerals which are essential for plant development.
  • Reduces the need for fertilizers: Because biochar is carbon-rich, it accelerates the decomposition of organic matter which results in more nutrients being available in the medium, a perfect choice for organic growers.
  • Can affect yields: Due to the porous characteristic, biochar can absorb too much water and nutrients when used in excess and can end up stressing your autoflowering plants which will show signs of deficiencies.
  • Can be contaminated: The quality of biochar is influenced by the material it is made of, so it can come contaminated with heavy metals or harmful compounds that are bad for your autoflowering plants.
  • Harmful to humans: If not dealt with caution, you can end up breathing ash which is a concern if exposed to daily, also, it can irritate you if it comes in contact with your eyes or skin for a long period of time.

Perlite

Perlite is usually used in soil mixes to increase aeration and improve the soil’s texture, by using perlite in the proper amounts you will not only improve drainage but also avoid compaction, making it a better medium for the roots to grow in. Usually, perlite is used in combination with coco fiber and soil to provide the best medium for the roots, while perlite improves aeration, coco fiber absorbs water, balancing those two elements in the best ratio possible.

Perlite can also be used to plant clones in, when you place your cuttings in perlite, the roots usually grow stronger and faster because they need oxygen to thrive and perlite helps provide it.

  • Increased aeration: Perlite creates small air pockets in the soil so if used properly, it can improve the growth rate.
  • Sterile medium: Because it’s a sterile medium, perlite won’t affect the pH of your medium or increase the amount of minerals in it.
  • Avoids soil compaction: Perlite needs to be thoroughly mixed in the soil before using, this will create several air pockets that make the soil fluffier, avoiding compaction.
  • Can dry the medium faster: You will need to check your autoflowering plants closely because with more oxygen in the soil you will have to water more often.
  • Needs to be washed first: If the brand you’re using does not pre-wash the perlite, it may come with a fine dust that can be harmful if inhaled so we recommend washing your perlite before using.
  • Needs to be watered more often: Because the medium will dry faster, you will need to water more and this means you will need to check on your autoflowering plants at least 2 times per day to make sure everything goes accordingly.

Vermiculite

Vermiculite can be used to improve the quality of your soil, just like perlite, vermiculite has several qualities that will make your autoflowering plants grow better and faster. This mineral helps aerate the soil, holds water and nutrients while not being toxic or changing the pH.

If your soil is compact or does not drain water properly, you can add vermiculite to provide the roots a better medium to grow in, just make sure you’re using the proper ratio because too much can hold a lot of nutrients and water and end up harming your autoflowering plants.

  • Neutral pH: Because it’s a sterile medium, vermiculite will not alter your soil’s pH so there’s no need to worry about checking the runoff every day.
  • Can prevent mold: When used in the proper ratio, vermiculite will absorb the excess water, preventing mold and fungus in the soil.
  • Improves soil quality: Just like perlite, vermiculite improves the soil’s texture and makes it fluffier, preventing soil compaction.
  • Can be expensive: Depending on where you live, vermiculite can be relatively hard to find and a bit expensive because it’s not usually found in regular grow shops.
  • Can affect autoflowering plants if used in excess: Because perlite holds nutrients and water, using it in excess can ultimately result in overwatering and overfeeding.
  • It’s said to be harmful: When buying low-quality vermiculite, it can contain asbestos and can cause lung problems. Inhaling these tiny fibers can cause asbestosis, mesothelioma, and lung cancer if exposed for a long time so it’s essential to buy the best quality possible and wash it before using it.

3. Signs of Good Soil

Due to the process in which soil is naturally produced, there are a few factors to consider if you are going to prepare your own. If buying soil from a well-known brand, or your local garden center’s cheap and cheerful products then there are some things to consider.

  • Check the packaging to see the nutritional value of the soil. A good brand will take the time to display a soil nutrient analysis displaying-N-P-K values, amount of perlite, vermiculite, compost, trace elements, and the bacterial and fungi count present.
  • Worms aerate the soil as they crawl through eating up organic matter. If you see your soil full of worms then do not worry. Not only will these little helpers aerate the soil but will release beneficial bacteria from their gut as they do.
  • Good store-bought soil will have perlite or coco added allowing for the ideal balance of air to water retention. Avoid soils that do not have any perlite unless you are purposely buying pure worm castings.

4. Signs of Bad Soil

  • Bad soil will have an unpleasant smell which is a red flag bad bacteria are present, causing the medium to be in an unfavorable acidic state.
  • Drainage will be poor, causing the soil to become dense and heavy. This weight can restrict root growth and slow plant development down dramatically. The ratio of water retention, drainage, and wicking capabilities will all be out of balance.

5. How to make your own soil

To make your own soil mix you need to have in mind the conditions that you will have during your growing cycle, things like temperature and humidity may have an influence in the best mix, so make sure you know the conditions before mixing your soil.

Best nutrients for soil

We recommend always using organic nutrients when growing in soil because soil it’s organic matter and contains microorganisms that can greatly benefit your autoflowering plants if taken care of properly. We cannot recommend a certain brand or organic nutrients line but as long as you’re using high-quality organic nutrients and use them appropriately, you’ll be fine. Just make sure the nutrients are 100% organic and keep an eye on the pH level because a drastic increase or decrease can ultimately kill the microorganisms present in your soil.

Benefits of good quality soil and what to keep in mind when you’re looking for the best soil for cannabis possible.

Cheap mix for DIY soil

Even though you can find organic nutrients in your local grow shops, they can be quite expensive so if you’re on a budget there are good alternatives that are relatively cheap.

There are several other methods to make your own organic nutrients such as KNF and Bokashi.

Depending on the space you have available, you can try composting or vermicomposting, these methods allow you to make your own tailored organic soil that will provide everything you need without spending too much.

Best soil for beginners

If you’re a beginner grower and don’t know exactly how things work, here is a general soil recipe that will work fantastically in almost all types of weathers, just remember that as time passes and you get more experienced, it’s ideal you adjust it to your specific needs.

General DIY soil recipe mix:
  • 80% organic soil
  • 10% perlite
  • 10% coco fiber

Remember that you can and should tweak it to your needs, but as long as you maintain a similar ratio your autoflowering plants will grow exceptionally.

PH too high or pH too low

If the pH of your medium is too high or too low, you should check the nutrient solution you’re feeding, have in mind that most additives are sterile and neutral so if you’re experiencing pH problems you should check the water source and nutrient solution.

Best soil for marijuana

The best soil mix for autoflowers or best marijuana soil, in general, will depend on the weather you have throughout your grow cycle, by following the table you can easily choose the one that better suits you.

Advantages of soil additives when growing autoflowering plants
Additive When to use Advantages
Coco fiber Use in dry environments or to improve soil quality. Holds water and helps avoid soil compaction.
Biochar Use in dry climates or when growing in organic soil. Improve water retention and helps decompose nutrients faster.
Perlite Used to help aerate the soil in humid environments. Helps dry the soil faster and increases aeration.
Vermiculite Used in dry environments, helps keep the soil moist. Improves soil quality and helps keep it moist.

As a general rule, you should always use 70-80% of organic soil mixed with the additive of your choice, always have in mind to use additives with different properties, for example, vermiculite shouldn’t be used with coco fiber because both absorb a lot of water and can cause overwatering.

  • 70% organic soil
  • 15% perlite
  • 15% coco fiber or 15% biochar or 15% vermiculite
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For the best soil for autoflower plants, we recommend using 70-80% organic soil mixed with 15% perlite and 15% coco fiber, or substituting coco for vermiculite or biochar, always respecting their properties to avoid having oxygen or water in excess. Remember that for the best growing medium for autoflowers, you should be on the lookout for the tips your plants give you and adjust the ratio if needed.

6. In conclusion

There isn’t a best soil for weed, in general, having all of the nutrients covered is one-half of a top-quality soil for marijuana, however, it should also have the ideal ratio of drainage, air pockets, and wicking action so we recommend looking into super soil for autoflowers.

Once you have found the ultimate balance, you can now confidently re-use your organic growing medium for multiple crops with the understanding the more time the living soil food web has to develop, the greater the results in terms of plant performance and yields.

What is the best soil for cannabis growing?

If you’ve thought about growing, you’ve probably already thought about the best soil for cannabis.

You likely didn’t give it that much thought, though, because who takes time to think about soil?

Well, the soil that you grow your marijuana in is very important, so if you want to grow the best weed possible, you should pay some attention to it.

This guide will cover everything you need to know about the common growing medium.

How to choose the best soil for marijuana plants:

The basics of using soil for marijuana grows

Plants typically need three things to survive: water, light, and soil.

Soil may seem obvious, but nowadays, with soil alternatives and hydroponic growing, even that is optional.

However, for most growers, especially those who are new to growing marijuana, growing in soil is the best option.

Soil growing (instead of growing in nutrient-infused water) is one of the easiest and most familiar methods of growing.

Plus, attempting to grow hydroponically the first time you are growing marijuana is almost guaranteed to be a recipe for disaster.

Soil is simply the natural way to grow, but it is still important to start with a good quality soil.

After all, it provides the plant’s nutrients and helps the plant form stable roots.

High-quality soil is especially important for outdoor plants who could face potentially harsh winds and other environmental conditions.

Why grow marijuana in soil?

Great soil can help your plants thrive, so it is essential to first understand what soil is.

It is definitely more than dirt.

Advantages of using soil

The soil is the most natural medium for growing almost all kinds of plants. It means that most people already are familiar with or have experience in doing it.

In effect, it is easier and less stressful to use than other modes of planting, which requires a learning curve.

Another advantage is its simplicity in making it work. Just watering the soil is enough for most plants to grow.

Also, the supplies needed are few compared to using other costlier mediums.

Natural soils are made up of mineral particles, air, organic matter, water and biological organisms.

Disadvantages of Using Soil

Since soil is an organic material, it is natural for bugs to live in it.

Therefore, the plants are more prone to suffer from pest infestations.

There is also the issue of slower growth.

In contrast, marijuana grown using hydroponics enjoys explosive growth due to faster and more efficient nutrient absorption.

Nearly 25% of soil is air that exists in a gaseous phase –not quite liquid or solid.

Water

Water is known as soil solution, a liquid made of water, and ions from dissolved salts, and chemicals.

These ions are unable to attach to minerals in the soil.

Water also makes up nearly 25% of soil. The mineral particles in soil consist of sand, clay, and silt.

These inorganic particles can significantly impact a soil’s quality.

These tiny fragments of rocks and hard minerals (such as quartz) do not carry any nutrients, meaning large amounts of it in your soil is a bad thing.

Soil with lots of sand is arid;

however, small to moderate amounts can improve drainage and aeration as well as increase tilling quality.

This mixture of sand and minerals has some nutrients, but not many.

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It is is beneficial for soil, as it can include the important nutrients of K, Ca, Mg and Fe- making soil fertile.

Clay is aluminum-silicate and has negatively charged ions that attract these nutrients to it.

However, if there is too much clay, it will be hard to till the soil, and there will also be poor drainage.

Soil also includes a variety of organic matter and substances such as:

  • Decomposing plant and animal particles
  • Organisms and microorganisms living in the soil
  • Substances produced by roots and microorganisms

These exist in smaller amounts, typically around 5%. Although there isn’t much organic matter in soil, its presence highly influences its quality and the eventual yield of your plants.

The particles and substances are also known as humus, whereas organisms may include earthworms and other beneficial creatures.

How to recognize the best soil for cannabis

Now that you understand what soil is, it is much easier to recognize good soil when you see it.

Marijuana soil has some specific requirements, so unless you are buying soil that is specifically designed for cannabis, you’ll want to learn to pay attention to certain things.

Good soil will have the correct texture, drainage ability and water retention for marijuana. It will look dark and rich, with a loose texture that isn’t muddy.

Good marijuana soil also drains well – you should be able to pour water on it and have it drain out within a few seconds.

The soil should retain enough water for the plant to thrive, as the roots need that water, but it shouldn’t be so much that the roots cannot get enough oxygen either.

This is why both proper drainage and water retention are essential aspects of good soil.

Good soil also has good ingredients. Of course, soils that include some form of organic matter (humus) are great for marijuana because they provide plenty of nutrients.

Some examples of organic matter to look for in a good cannabis soil include:

  • Earthworm castings
  • Bat Guano
  • Blood, fish, or bone meal
  • Kelp
  • Mycorrhizae
  • Perlite
  • Pumice
  • Sandy Loam
  • Dolomite lime

If you purchase soil that has any of these ingredients in it, there’s a good chance it might provide great nutrition for your plants.

You’ll still want to make sure that it has the right nutrients for your plant’s particular stage in its life cycle though.

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Choosing soil for your marijuana plants

With an understanding of what you are looking for, you can now start to select the right soil for your plants.

The first thing to remember is that soil is highly dependent on the stage of life that your plant is in.

While it is still sprouting, it is best to use peat plugs or something similar to that.

These ready-made blocks of soil provide everything that a budding seed needs to make its way into the world.

If you can’t find, (or don’t want to use) peat plugs, an organic potting soil will also work.

Organic soils will not have any added ‘slow-release’ chemicals, something you’ll want to avoid when growing marijuana.

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While potting soils do not have the right type of nutrients to support a growing marijuana plant, they will have enough to support a seedling for its first couple of weeks.

After that point, you’ll want to supplement with nutrients that are specifically designed for marijuana plants – especially once you reach the flowering stage.

Another reason why it is okay to use potting soil (at least at first) is because you’re likely going to end up moving your plants after they are about a month old anyway.

The roots will be too big for their first home, and you should place them in a bigger container or move them outdoors.

That is the perfect time to switch out your soil for something more suitable.

If you used peat plugs, you can simply add the plugs to local dirt or grass mulch to make a suitable soil outdoors.

Not only does this provide a better texture over the natural earth, but it also offers ample room for young roots to move around and increases the nutrient value in the soil.

You can also move your seedlings into either sterilized potting compost or a “living soil.”

If you opt for sterilized soil, it should include some form of amendment (such as perlite), that makes up at least 20% of the soil.

This additive will help increase the amount of air present in the soil, which helps marijuana plants grow faster.

Living soils, on the other hand, are composted soils.

They are useful because they include microorganisms that create an ecosystem similar to the best natural scenario.

The roots directly absorb the nutrients produced from these organisms, and the results are often noticeable in the flavor and scent of the harvest.

Learn now how to choose the best soil for growing cannabis

Most weed gardeners know that growing cannabis in soil is a common and effective growing method.

The difficulty is that growers have to peruse through many soil options and may find it challenging to determine the right option for them.

Well, sit tight! In this article, we’ll be showing you how to choose the best soil for cannabis to give your marijuana the best chances of fat buds and a huge yield.

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Why is choosing the best soil for cannabis very important?

Soil is one of the three components (including water and light) needed to help a plant

Choosing the best soil is vital as, without it, a plant can’t grow effectively and may end up lacking nutrients or even under developing. Good earth also helps provide plants with the health needed to survive under challenging weather conditions.

Along with learning about temperature and humidity for growing weed, understanding soil is vital. It spells the difference between a plant that didn’t grow to one that exceeded expectations.

The components that make up the soil

Soil consists of several components and is quite complex in its makeup. Let’s look at what these are:

  • Air: 25% of soil is simply air.
  • Water: A further 25% of the earth is water. It’s vital for moving nutrients to the plants.
  • Clay: One of the three primary materials found in soil, clay, like the other minerals, is derived from broken-down rocks.
  • Sand: This is one of the primary minerals found in dirt. Minerals, in fact, make up 46% of all soil.
  • Silt: The second of the primary minerals found within the soil.
  • Organic matter: This makes up the remaining 4% of the earth. Soils high in organic matter are brilliant for plant growth.

Knowing what good soil is

You can identify excellent cannabis soil by looking at a few key indicators.

  • Dark and loose: Dark soil is rich soil. It means that they contain plenty of organic matter, sodium, and healthy nutrients. Loose soil allows for better aeration.
  • Good drainage & water retention: Good drainage means that the marijuana water can drain to the bottom well. Well-drained earth ensures that your cannabis stays wet for a reasonable amount of time. An appropriate amount of water retention is vital to keep cannabis healthy.
  • The correct pH value: The ideal pH value is about 6.0 as cannabis plants thrive better in a slightly acidic environment.
  • Organic matter: Organic matter is decomposed material derived from plants and animals. It helps provide nutrients and improves the water holding capacity of the soil. Examples include compost and manure.

Choosing the best soil for marijuana

The best soil depends on the conditions that you’re growing your marijuana. So, for example, what’s needed for outdoor marijuana is different from that for indoor cannabis.

Let’s break it down.

Best soil for outdoor cannabis

The benefit of growing cannabis outdoors is that your plants won’t be as restricted and can further grow their roots.

However, you’ll have to monitor and possibly change the soil’s pH level if it’s not suitable.

Cannabis plants all need nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium in their soil ‘diet’. These nutrients will be absorbed at different rates and need to be renewed with a good marijuana fertilizer from time to time.

A dark, crumbly loam works best outdoors that’s mostly silt.

Best soil for indoor cannabis

Loamy soil is the best for indoor cannabis. An ideal mixture of 40% silt, 40% clay, and 20% sand offers a loose soil texture for adequate oxygenation and root growth. This mix also offers good water retention, drainage, and an ideal pH level of 6.0.

Best potting soil for cannabis

Firstly, it’s important to note that no matter what pot you use, always make sure that there are holes at the bottom to prevent your cannabis from drowning.

Cannabis can be effectively grown in pots using pre-packaged organic soil.

An alternative is to make what is known as a ‘super soil’ mix. You’ll have to find a super soil recipe or order a mix online. It’s a great option as it self-regulates its pH levels.

Best organic soil for cannabis

Creating the best organic soil for marijuana is tricky, but there are a few components that can drastically improve its health and efficacy:

Component What it offers
Worm castings This is a good source of nitrogen. It’ll also give your soil the added benefit of many micronutrients.
Bone meal For a source of phosphorus, this is the way to go.
Chicken manure Chicken manure is an excellent source for adding nitrogen and phosphorus to your soil.
Bat guano This is also a good way to get phosphorus and nitrogen into your organic soil. It also diversifies the soil’s bacteria.
Compost Compost piles can be an excellent source of nutrients such as potassium.
Kelp meal Both promoting microbial diversity and offering potassium, kelp meal is a great component to add to organic soil.

Best soil for autoflowering cannabis

Autoflower cannabis seeds transition automatically from the vegetative to flowering stage regardless of the light availability.

However, for this type of cannabis, light and aerated soil is preferred. This aids the roots in growing deeper.

You can make the best soil for autoflowers from peat moss, compost, vermiculite, and coco coir.

Store-bought vs. homemade

If you’re not interested in the hassle of putting together your own soil, then you can always stop at a local shop or peruse an online store for some good-quality mix that’s ready-made.

Although homemade soil may lack on some fronts, it does offer certain benefits. Let’s take a look at what those are compared to store-bought:

Homemade Cannabis Soil Store-Bought Cannabis Soil
Greater flexibility of choice. Already pre-packaged.
Generally cheaper than store-bought cannabis. More expensive than homemade cannabis.
It requires more research to figure out and can be complicated. The work to put together nutrients and research is already done for you.
Easier and cheaper to make in bulk. Often comes in smaller packaging.

How to make your own soil

Making your own soil may be preferable for many as ready-made soil mixes can be pretty expensive. Here are a few steps that you can follow to get started:

Step 1: To start with creating your marijuana soil mix, you can opt to find soil at your local gardening store. Alternatively, you can use the soil you have at home.

Step 2: Next, you’ll need to add the building blocks of cannabis: nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. You can find these components in worm castings, bone meal, and compost.

Step 3: Then, mix the soil. It’s as simple as that, and you’re on your way to having the best soil to grow marijuana.

Improving the soil, you already have

There are several minerals, soils, and nutrients that you can add to the soil you already have to make it suitable to grow excellent cannabis. Here are a few suggestions:

  • Coco for cannabis: Coco-coir is a flexible growing medium made out of coconut shells that grants your plants the ability to grow even faster than they already are.
  • Perlite: This can help loosen and provide excellent aeration to the soil and also aids in the speed of growth of the plant.
  • Vermiculite: This is good for dampening the soil and raising the pH level of your cannabis.
  • Worm castings: These are great for resolving nitrogen cannabis deficiencies. This nutrient-rich manure is perfect for any weed soil mix.
  • Nutrients: Along with nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus, marijuana soil also needs calcium, magnesium, copper, iron, and many others.

Before we move on to our FAQs: if you want to know more about growing, be sure to check out our marijuana for beginners guide. It offers a lot of helpful information about costs, climate, strains, and much more relating to growing marijuana.

FAQs related to best soil for cannabis

We’ve scoured the internet and put together the most frequently asked questions to help you find the best soil for growing weed.

What is the best soil for growing cannabis?

Loam is undoubtedly the best soil for growing cannabis. Its pH level is close to the ideal level of 6.0. Regrettably, it’s quite an expensive soil to buy but a worthwhile investment if you want to grow the best marijuana plants possible.

What is the best soil for outdoor cannabis?

Outdoor cannabis grows well with organic soil. You can make your own or opt to purchase a mix online or at a local garden store.

What is the best soil for indoor cannabis?

The ideal is the same as the best overall cannabis soil, which is loam. If you’re not willing to pay the price, though, you can always opt for a nice pre-packaged cannabis soil mix. Just make sure that it’s full of quality nutrients!

What is the best organic soil for cannabis?

You’ll want a soil mix that’s teaming with all the necessary micro and macronutrients needed for your plants. A nice blend of worm castings, rock dust, bone meal, bat guano, and various other soil amendments is the way to go.

What are the best nutrients for cannabis in soil?

The fundamentals are:

  • Nitrogen (blood meal, ammonia, or cottonseed meal).
  • Phosphate (bone meal, slag, and rock phosphate).
  • Potassium (wood ashes or seaweeds).

It comes down to you

As you can see, there’s a lot to consider when choosing the best soil for growing marijuana. It depends on the type, where you’ll be growing it, and what you hope to achieve.

There are a lot of great ready-made products out there, both online and in-store. It just takes some time and research to figure out which is right for you.

Do you feel ready to start growing? Peruse the i49 website and decide on the right cannabis seeds for you to start your growing journey today.

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