Best Temp And Humidity For Germinating Weed Seeds

ILGM

Buy Cannabis Seeds Online

Without a doubt, germination is one of the most important stages in cannabis cultivation. In this article we will take a look at some of the most comm Temperatures and Medical Cannabis Growing: From Seedling to Harvest The marijuana industry created an estimated $34 billion economic impact in 2018. Legal sales of marijuana are expected to So what is the best temperature for growing weed and what about the humidity in your grow room? Check it out!

5 common mistakes when germinating cannabis seeds

Although the germination of cannabis seeds is a relatively quick and easy process, it is crucial to take into account a series of important factors in order to obtain as high a germination rate as possible. In addition, it’s in our interest that the seeds germinate as quickly as possible, and especially if we want to avoid problems like fungal infection or a low germination rate.

In our article on how to germinate cannabis seeds we explain step by step what you must do to achieve successful germination. Today we will take a look at the main mistakes made during this process, some simple errors that, as we will see, can easily be solved. Let’s see where many growers fail to germinate their seeds, it’s a great way to learn what not to do if we want to make the most of our seeds.

A germinating cannabis seed

Letting the germination medium dry out

By placing the seed in a moist culture medium, it begins a series of reactions that will lead to germination in a few hours or days. Whichever substrate we choose for germination, we must ensure that it never completely dries out, because as the seed stops absorbing moisture, it’s likely that the seed will cease its activity and never germinate. Cialis for Erectile Dysfunction http://valleyofthesunpharmacy.com/cialis/

For this reason, it is advisable to check every day to make sure the germination medium remains moist, especially if a heat source is used to achieve a higher temperature and therefore a better germination rate; the heat will cause the substrate to dry more quickly, something that must be kept in mind to avoid nasty surprises. In case of hydroponic cultivation it is always better to germinate in rock wool cubes, which of course must always remain moist.

The paper towel should never dry out once germination begins

Leaving seeds to germinate for too long

Another common mistake, in this case when germinating in kitchen paper or similar, is to let the seed germinate until the cotyledons appear. If we do this, then the subsequent transplant is very difficult, and it is very likely that we’ll damage the root in the attempt. Additionally, the longer the root is exposed to air and light, the more damage will result, so it is preferable to transplant it before this occurs.

To avoid problems, it is best to plant the seeds when the tap-root measures approximately 1cm, or 2cm at the most. This will make it much easier to transplant and we won’t harm the development of the roots, which can be expand into the new growing medium without setbacks. Phentemrine diet pills http://kendallpharmacy.com/phentermine.html

Direct germination in soil

This is a common mistake that usually results in non-germination, especially if the substrate hasn’t been previously watered before sowing the seed but is watered afterwards. By planting the seed directly in the substrate, we run the risk of it being buried too deep, made worse when we irrigate the growing medium post-sowing.

To obtain much better results, first germinate seeds in kitchen paper, jiffy pellets or peat plugs used for rooting cuttings and then transplant them to the soil or to a pot once the small seedlings have been born. Another benefit of this method is that we can germinate a large number of seeds in a very small space, such as a small greenhouse, which will make it much easier to provide the correct temperature and humidity.

Temperature and humidity for germination

Cannabis seeds germinate correctly with relatively high temperature and humidity values. It will be necessary, especially during some seasons of the year, to use some source of heat to get a temperature of about 26-28ºC. For this purpose there are many options on the market, such as thermal cables or heated greenhouses. The latter are particularly interesting because they also provide the perfect high humidity environment for seed germination.

The ideal is to maintain the germination medium at about 26-28ºC and at 70% relative humidity. Lower values ​​will result in a slower and less successful germination, while higher values ​​can bring fungal or rot problems.

A heated greenhouse is perfect for germinating seeds

Planting the seed incorrectly

If you look closely at a cannabis seed, you will notice that it has a slightly oval shape, ending in a point at one end and forming a small “crater” at the other end, which is called the crown. When planting your seed (whether it’s a seed that you want to germinate, for example, in a jiffy, or a seed already germinated on kitchen paper that you want to transplant) you must keep in mind that this crown should always be facing upwards.

So, you should plant the seed with the tip down and the crown uppermost and facing you. Once the seed germinates the crown will serve as a hinge, so that the seed will open at the tip and let out the root. In case of placing the seed incorrectly, the tap root will grow upward and the seedling downwards, which should be avoided at all costs because it is likely that the seedling will not be born.

Planting at the incorrect depth

Too often the seed is buried too deep (a problem that we have already seen in case of watering after planting the seed), so the seedling may never emerge. In the other case, if we sow too close to the surface, we can find that the seed germinates well but the stem grows weak, bending and not allowing the seedling to develop correctly.

To avoid these problems it is be best to sow the seed at about 2cm depth. In addition, we can cover the lower stem as the seedling grows, so that it gains stability and produces new roots along the length of stem we have buried. In this way we can accelerate the growth of the plants.

We should plant the seed with the root downwards

Planting several seeds in the same pot

Although it may be tempting, germinating several seeds in the same container is not usually successful. In addition to the difficulty of correctly planting several seeds in the same pot, once they are born they will compete for the little space available for their roots. Having restricted root growth does not suit cannabis plants, which will grow more weakly and with greater internodal distance.

In addition, the scarce space between the plants will also mean they will compete for available light, something not recommended if we want to get the most out of each plant. The plants will produce very little lateral branching, and will center their growth on a weak main stem, with too long an internodal distance, factors that usually affects negatively on the final yield of buds.

We hope that this article will help you avoid problems when germinating your seeds, it can be very frustrating to start a grow with all the enthusiasm and excitement, only to run into problems straight away! Do not hesitate to leave us any doubts, comments or your own tips and tricks, we’ll be happy to answer you.

Comments in “5 common mistakes when germinating cannabis seeds” (49)

Giacomo 2022-07-01
I’ve been growing since I was 13. I am 66. Not a boast. It just is. My comment is not so much about growing weed but rather about a lack of civility AND (not necessarily limited to only this forum). For the most part cannibis “enthusiasts” are wonderful people. Still, is it my imagination or are there a lot of condescending pricks (can I say that?) on these forums. Some of which are “Newbee Experts” criticizing anything that didn’t come out of their own mouths? When the Real Expert offers an opinion that doesn’t mesh with the self proclaimed genius’s vast knowledge base, they tend to respond with very little grace. So I guess this is more about the general state of things and what some people believe is acceptable behavior. Just a thought. Cannabis community, let’s treat each other with respect. We’ve made so much ground and it’s taken SO MANY years. Let’s not screw that up.

See also  Fast Growing Weed Seeds

Giacomo 2022-07-01
Just a quick poll for those of you with a few growing seasons under their belt. Have you found that your failure rate with seed germination has been increasing. I suppose it is possible that I’ve just had a bad run but my success over the last two grows has been about 50%. I’ve been doing this stuff for a long time and my technique is sound. Just seems like I have more duds lately (I have not purchased seeds from Philosofer).

Fishgutz 2022-01-16
I quit reading long back when the initial 100 seed results were reasoned. I’ll likely be missing many points observed. Simple opinion, for better than 25 million years of natural survival this plant has recreated itself for man to adapt to its uses in a very short 10,000 or how ever many years there’s been somebody crapping In a watermelon patch Surely it knows its way around a 2cm [email protected]&?ing hole surrounded by its predecessors environment. I would think genetically it knows what the !(@& to do. Especially if you are using a “Feminized seed”. Now, surely many observations have been made justifiable or not the laws of average are easily debatable, but I believe that the laws of average have established the standards many moons ago friends. Maybe I’ll fill up a kiddie pool 4ft Dia. @6 inches deep perlite and drop a 100 seeds through a pine bow from 6 feet high and then document the seeds position when it’s at rest in the perlite.. . I’m Extremely new to cuktuvating cannabis, my 2nd year. My first year turned out peesonally satisfiable at best simply because I planted shark cookies. I germinated in a paper towel, from there I rested the seed however it rested in a tub of perlite with an aquarium bubbler, also a circulator moving a solution of compost tea through the roots for 2 weeks, then put them in a small crawl area with a fan and a few lights for another 45 days, and then moved them to a bucket and put outside for the next 3 months and then brought back inside for another 2 weeks. So any opinions that we all have are open for discussion, but the only resolution for judgement is our own environmental abilities to nurture the development of variable genetics. Happy gardening friends..

Tim 2022-01-17
Hi and thanks for your comment. We’re happy that your first year of cultivation was a reasonable success, we hope that this year will be even more so! Germinating seeds may seem like the most natural and easy thing in the world, and that’s how it should be, but it’s amazing just how many people fall at this first hurdle, and when the seeds are not particularly cheap, as in the case of cannabis, it becomes even more nerve-wracking, especially for beginner growers and those who have no basic experience of growing other plants like vegetables, flowers, etc. There’s no real substitute for experience in this game, and the more seeds we pop, the more confidence we get. Thanks again for your comment, best wishes to you!

Jubjub 2021-11-19
Hello Good day I have some that looks like stale might be more than years old seeds. It was a given to me by a friend and I doubt it was preserved properly in proper containers. Will it still germinate?

Tim 2021-11-24
Hi, thanks for your comment and question. The older the seeds are, the less chance they will germinate, and if they weren’t stored in good conditions (dry, cool, stable, e.g. in the fridge) then the chances of non-germination become even greater. You can try a few things to help improve germination rates, for example, the application of fulvic acid and/or gibberellic acid will give older seeds a better chance of germinating. Try germinating a few of the seeds in the normal way and then if you don’t get success I’d look at using one or both of the compounds I mentioned. I hope that helps, all the best!

Raz 2021-09-08
I have germinated five seeds of different stains, all paper towel method. All sprouted.. All healthy.. All put in good seedling raising mix but the problem is they just sit dormant just not growing. I grow under lights. Last year.. No problems this year no growth. Seeds r less than a year old. HELP.

Tim 2021-09-08
Hi and thanks for your comment. To work out the problem, we need to eliminate a few possibilities. First, check that the temperature and humidity levels within your grow area are suitable for vegetative growth: ideally from 20 to 28ºC with 40-60% RH. Then verify whether your lamps need changing – old bulbs put out significantly less light than new ones, which could be leading to poor growth. If all those factors are as they should be then the most likely culprit is the soil mix itself – the quality can vary from season to season, even with the best brands, so it’s always possible that there could be pests or pathogens in the soil which are preventing the seedlings from making progress. I would recommend trying with a different brand of soil to see if that makes a difference. I hope that helps. Best wishes and good luck!

Fishnass 2021-08-30
I germinated in paper towel until tap root was as long as seed it curled around the seed anyway my question is if I planted in jiffy pod should I put it under light or wait till it pops up to put it in the light .

Tim 2021-09-01
Hi and thanks for your comment & question. The newly germinated seed doesn’t really need a light source while it’s below the soil surface but as soon as it pops out it will need light to prevent it from becoming stretchy, lanky and unhealthy. For this reason, it’s probably best to keep it under a light with a photoperiod of 18 hours light and 6 hours darkness for the day or two that it takes to break the surface. I hope that helps, best wishes!

Master 2021-08-13
You’re incorrect, seeds should be planted pointy end up crown down.

Tim 2021-08-16
Hi Master, thanks for your comment. I honestly don’t believe there’s a correct or incorrect way. In our time, we’ve tried germinating seeds point down, point up and also laying them on their side in the soil, and we’ve come to the conclusion that it makes no difference at all – we certainly didn’t see any real difference in the results of one method compared to another. In nature, cannabis seed dispersal doesn’t rely on the seed landing in the soil in any particular position and it’s managed to spread pretty well! That said, if you like to sow your seeds pointy end down, then that’s great, keep doing it your way if it works for you! Best wishes!

Sean 2021-05-17
I had my seeds in the paper towel for 3 days. The tap-roots appeared(not out just showing a bit) and I planted them in the soil. 3 days have past and I haven’t seen any progress. Is there a reason why this is happening?

Tim 2021-05-17
Hi Sean, thanks for your comment. As long as the soil is neither too wet nor too dry, there shouldn’t be a problem with the seeds. They can take a few days to pop their heads up above the surface once they’re planted, the root needs to work its way downwards and find a solid hold to be able to push the seed head out of the soil. Speaking from personal experience, don’t be tempted to dig around looking for them as you’ll probably do more damage than good. The only times that seeds didn’t come up for me were the times I overwatered them, it’s crucial that they get enough air at this moment and too much water can lead to them rotting quickly. Of course, if they totally dry out then they’re not going to survive either. At this stage, I’d just recommend patience, good luck! Best wishes!

Pothead 2021-05-12
This article has a lot of nonsense in it. From Mandala Seeds: A #1 seed killer is a closed humidity dome/mini-greenhouse. Humidity domes are only required for rooting cuttings. Many growers make the mistake of thinking that they need a high ambient humidity for germination or seedlings. This is an unfortunate myth of cannabis cultivation. The high humidity and lack of fresh ventilation quickly causes fungus in the soil or growing medium and the seeds can rot! Cannabis is not an orchid or swamp plant! The seeds need a well aerated growing medium to germinate well. Seedlings also cannot tolerate high humidity and can easily be attacked by fungus such as fusarium and pythium. Only the soil or growing medium should be moist for optimal germination and seedling growth. Ambient humidity is best at or below 50%. Btw, seed should be planted with the pointed end UP, not down. Tap root ALWAYS goes up no matter how you place the seed. It’s by the nature, goes against the gravity to create a support for itself so it can push the seed out. It you put it with the pointed end down it will have to make double turn loosing the precious energy stored in the seed.

See also  Cannabis Seeds Sink Or Float

Tim 2021-05-13
Hi, thanks for your contribution. Mandala Seeds give some helpful advice but they don’t have a monopoly on germination methods! In my 20 years germinating seeds I’ve tried all different methods and I’ve found good and bad in all of them. except for the methods using moist paper towels, I refuse to use it these days – I found that’s a great way to get mold problems and a really bad start to the plant’s life! That definitely is far too much humidity. as for ambient humidity, we don’t specify anything in this post. What we do say is that the medium in which the seeds are germinating should be at about 70% humidity for the best results. There’s nothing wrong with using a humidity dome or mini greenhouse, as long as you know when to start ventilating. of course if it’s kept sealed all the time then problems are bound to arise! These days I start all mine in a glass of water with a few drops of H202 and then once the seeds open (usually 24 hours) they get transferred to the substrate. As for the point down/point up debate, I think I’ll need to do a side-by-side comparison to settle this in my own mind. I’ve always planted them point downwards or on their side and I’ve yet to see any weird stuff like roots popping out of the surface, or doing a loop-the-loop before the seedling breaks the surface. But it’s clear that the debate needs to be settled so I’ll do an experiment and I’ll be happy to be proved wrong! EDIT: I’ve since germinated over 100 seeds as a test, 1/3 of them went in the soil with the point downwards, 1/3 sideways, and 1/3 with the point upwards. Most of the seedlings broke the surface at around the same time but it’s clear to see that the ones that I’m still waiting for are mostly those that went in with the point upwards. The next step has to be a test in a terrarium so I can actually see what’s going on but I’m almost ready to call complete BS on this “point upwards” theory, FWIW. Thanks again for your comment, all the best!

Strange 2021-04-04
Pls how can i get seeds to Nigeria

Temperatures and Medical Cannabis Growing: From Seedling to Harvest

The marijuana industry created an estimated $34 billion economic impact in 2018. Legal sales of marijuana are expected to increase from $10 billion in 2018 to $20 billion by 2022, according to the Marijuana Business Fact Book. This means that more and more legal growers (under strict governmental regulations) will be on the American horizon seeking the best indoor growing practices. Temperature and humidity monitoring are essential for growing healthy cannabis plants throughout the entire life of the plant…seedling to harvest.

What’s the Difference Between Temperatures and Humidity Levels?

Temperature and humidity levels interact and are very similar and are closely related to one another. Humidity is the measure of how much humidity is actually being held in the air. Relative humidity (RH) which is one way to measure humidity levels, is how much water is in the air compared to the maximum amount of water that can be held in the air at that temperature. The premise is that warm air holds more water vapor than cold air so it is important to get the warmest air in the environment. It is necessary to extract the warmest air from the growing environment while allowing cool air to enter. The warm air alone has way too much vapor for ideal growing conditions.

Horticulturalists know that the key to success in any growing plant is understanding the lifecycle of the plant. This is also true with growing cannabis. Throughout every stage of growth, cannabis plants will have a constant need for water which the amounts will fluctuate with the humidity. When the humidity is high, plants use their leaves to absorb moisture from the air which results in less water drawn from their roots. On the other hand, when the humidity is low, cannabis plants will take more water through their roots.

Monitoring and having the right humidity encourages strong, healthy, nutrient-dense leafy plants with optimal growth.

Humidity levels must be monitored to prevent:

1. Bud Mold/Rot: A condition when the inside of the plant is taken over by mold. When this happens the buds are unusable.

2. White Powder Mildew: White Powder Mildew (WPM) is a rapidly reproducing fungal disease resulting in a white powder or mildew covering the plant. If caught early enough, it can be prevented, if not the plant will become unusable.

3. Nutrient Problems: If a cannabis plant takes in too many nutrients at once the leaves will turn yellow and the tips will look burnt, called nutrient burn or nute burn.

4. Slowed Growth: If humidity levels are not optimal for the growth stage, they don’t grow as fast as they could. Younger cannabis plants grow better in higher humidity than more mature plants.

So, the next question is how do you measure the ideal levels?

Cannabis Temperature Monitoring In All Stages of Growth

There are four stages or periods of cannabis growing, all requiring different temperature and humidity levels. They are seedling, vegetation, flowering, and late flowering. Experts recommend monitoring levels throughout all four stages using a digital thermometer and a digital hygrometer that include a memory feature so history can be reviewed. The four stages and what they require are:

1. Seedling Stage: Seedlings or clones, little cut-off pieces from a parent plant that needs to develop roots, require high humidity levels between 65 and 70 percent. These high humidity levels are needed because the root system is not established and humidity allows water intake through the plants’ leaves. Young growing cannabis plants prefer temperatures between 75 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit. Anything above 80 degrees Fahrenheit is not recommended.

2. Vegetation Period: This is the stage that cannabis starts developing its renowned leaf shape. It is important to note that light exposure is a very important part of this stage. The number of humidity levels should be lowered by five percent each week throughout the vegetation period. The temperature can be increased, too because roots absorb more water and evaporate through the plants’ leaves. Humidity levels should be before 40 and 70 percent. If wet spots are forming on the leaves, humidity levels are too high.

3. Flowering Plants: The humidity levels of cannabis plants at the beginning of the flowering stage should be lowered to 40 to 50 percent. At this stage, the plants have created a robust root system to meet their water needs. They still absorb water through the leaves. A lower humidity level is required to prevent mold and mildew from forming. Note that mold and mildew infect the plant from the inside the buds, so it isn’t visible at first.

4. Late Flowering Period: This period lasts anywhere between six and 12 weeks and when plants mature. During this time careful temperature and humidity monitoring are necessary. It is recommended that humidity levels be lowered between 30 and 40 percent to improve the yield, flavor, and appearance of the plant. Temperatures can range between 70 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit.

Tips To Adjust Temperature and Humidity for Cannabis Growing

It can be difficult to keep humidity and temperature levels at the right balance throughout the plants’ life cycle. Keep in mind that warm air retains more water than cold air and that relative humidity and temperature interact to create the perfect balance. The following are hands-on tips for adjusting these levels but note that there is technology available in the SaaS Cloud that will wirelessly do the work for you.

Tips to Lower Humidity and Temperature:

  1. Increase fresh, cool air in the growing area
  2. Water plants right when lights are turned on in the growing area
  3. Add a dehumidifier to regulate humidity in the growing area
See also  Ministry Of Cannabis Seeds

Tips to Increase Humidity and Temperature

  1. Keep the soil surface moist
  2. Surround the room with moist towels and open containers of water
  3. Use a humidifier to constantly add moisture to the room

It is difficult to be present for the entire life cycle of a cannabis plant. There are more innovative and technological methods for monitoring temperature and humidity levels. Contact SensoScientific for a free trial and to learn more about the most advanced wireless monitoring solution available for cannabis temperature monitoring.

Best Temperature and Humidity for Growing Weed

Getting the temperature right for your cannabis plants is an essential part of each stage of the growing process. If the temperature in your grow room or outdoors is too hot or too cold, your young weed plants will not be able to photosynthesise properly, and this will inevitably affect their growth and development. However, it is not as simple as saying ‘this is the correct temperature; the temperature needs of the plants vary according to their stage of development, so you must have some knowledge of their requirements. To help you, we have written this guide which will explain the best temperature and humidity for growing weed for each phase of your young weed plants.

Now, we understand that establishing the ideal temperature for weed plants can be tricky – some say that it is as much instinct as it is science. However, it is certainly possible to work things out for the growing conditions of your plants, and this article will tell you everything you need to know.

What you need to know about temperature and humidity

The first thing you need to understand is the close relationship between temperature and humidity levels. Let’s look at science. Humidity refers to the amount of water vapour present in the air. At higher temperatures, molecules move at top speeds; thus the probability of condensation of water vapour due to the collision of molecules is less. This makes the air hold more water vapour at high temperatures. In other words, as the temperature increases, the humidity of air also increases.

Most plants including cannabis plants, need humid air to thrive. This is because the pores through which they breathe lose most of their moisture when the surrounding air is dry, a loss that the plant can’t always replace through the water absorbed by its roots. The thinner the leaf – and cannabis plants have quite small, narrow leaves, the higher its need for humidity.

When deciding the correct temperature for your plants, therefore, it is also sensible to assess the humidity levels as the two go hand-in-hand. To do this, you should invest in a good-quality thermometer and a hygrometer, ideally digital models with the ability to store historical maximum and minimum levels.

When the temperature is 68°F (20°C), air can absorb 7.2 ml of water maximum. When this occurs, the air has a relative humidity of 100 percent. There will be so much water vapour that the air will be as dense as a cloud and will affect your ability to see anything. Air with a temperature of 32°F (0°C) is only able to absorb about 5 ml of water. This is the reason why the air is a lot drier in the winter than in the summer.

Temperature and humidity for the germination phase

The first moments of your cannabis plant’s life are crucial. Germinating seeds indoors will allow you to have more control over the temperature, but it is also possible to do so outdoors if the climate conditions allow. Having a high temperature (from 22 to 26°C) is an important factor for your seeds to decide to emerge into the world.

However, the temperature must not fall to less than 20 degrees Celsius nor rise to more than 30. If you are using a greenhouse for the germination phase, be warned that it can get sweltering so you must regularly monitor the temperature. Humidity must also be continuously monitored. If the seed trays dry up, germination will not take place or recently sprouted shoots will wither and die. You must not forget to add water when necessary – a spray dispenser is gentle for this, but you should not give them too much water. The seeds should only be soaking wet during the first two days.

Once the first seedlings emerge with two cotyledons (the first two round leaves that develop), they should be carefully transplanted. If the seeds are autoflowering, you should transplant them to a large pot. If they are feminised seeds, however, you can transplant them to a smaller container and move them to the large bowl when they are a bit more established.

Best temperatures and humidity for the seedling phase

The optimal conditions for cannabis seedlings are a sunny, warm (20-25ºC) and humid environment with well-circulated air. Their underdeveloped root systems mean that seedlings need to be exposed to lots of light and heat. Problems arise as their immaturity means that they cannot withstand high temperatures. Therefore, we recommend that growers maintain 20ºC to 25ºC indoor environments when the lights are on.

Humidity levels also need to be high. Levels between 65 percent and 70 percent are sufficient for seedlings to absorb enough water through their leaves.

Optimal temperatures for the vegetative phase

You can start to relax a bit during the vegetative phase. As cannabis plants mature, they grow stronger and better able to cope with extremes of heat. They start to be more resistant to heat and cold. You can raise the temperature to as much as 30ºC.

As the roots have sufficiently developed to absorb plenty of water, you may wish to reduce humidity levels by 5 percent each week. The relative humidity should ideally fall between 40 percent and 70 percent.

The best humidity and temperatures for the flowering phase

The last phase of the cannabis growth cycle is the flowering phase. Growers should aim to maintain warm temperatures that are pretty much the same as when the plants were at the seedling stage. Ensure that the temperature stays at a nice warm 20ºC to 25C to prevent buds from burning their terpenes. This will allow your plants to produce deliciously potent flowers.

It is also a good idea to lower humidity levels to about 40 percent to 50 percent, especially during the late flowering phase. This encourages the production of highly-prized resin and a higher terpene content leading to a more aromatic and flavourful crop.

Cultivators should be advised that typical temperature variance when the lights are switched off is 5ºC, and this applies to all the phases of development.

Temperatures that are too cold

Temperatures that are too cold will slow down a cannabis plant’s metabolism and its roots system will become increasingly ineffective. If temperatures drop below 12 degrees, the plant is even at risk of death.

The obvious solution to boosting the temperature of the grow room is to get an electric heater and plug it in. This has several disadvantages, however, mainly due to its high consumption of electricity but also because of its drying nature which can affect levels of humidity, and the direct distribution of the heat which makes it hard for all the plants to enjoy the uneven heat. An oil-filled portable radiator is another option if you can get one which isn’t too large to fit into the grow space. We recommend small tubular electric heaters which can be placed conveniently on the floor and only use a few watts of electricity. Radiating cables for indoor use are another excellent alternative, especially if you need to heat trays of seedlings.

Temperatures that are too hot

Reducing heat levels in a grow tent can be much harder to control than the reverse. We recommend using electric fans to circulate the air as much as possible to disperse the heat and thus cool the young cannabis plants.

Placing an exhaust fan in the ceiling vent of your grow tent is also highly effective at reducing heat. After all, heat always rises to the top.

You could also use a cooling humidifier which reduces temperatures while boosting humidity levels. Just take care that the humidity does not increase too much for the growth phase. Remember, seedlings need higher levels of humidity than vegetative marijuana plants, for which 40 percent is optimal.

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 5 / 5. Vote count: 1

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.