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Buying Cannabis Seeds in Michigan: Your Guide to Buying Seeds Online
On December 6, 2018, Michigan’s recreational marijuana law went into effect.
Officially titled the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marijuana Act, this law allows state residents to consume, but not purchase, recreational marijuana.
While Michiganders anxiously await the day that they can buy pot legally, state officials are inching toward making it a reality.
In fact, on November 1, 2019, the Marijuana Regulatory Agency will begin accepting business licenses from retailers hoping to sell recreational marijuana in their stores. Approvals will begin around December 6, 2019.
Looking to get high in the meantime? We’ve got plenty of cannabis seeds Michigan residents can purchase, plant and enjoy.
Today, we’re discussing more state-specific regulations to know. We’ll also share an insider look at our seed inventory so you can choose the best ones for you!
Ready to learn more? Let’s go!

Female plants contain the valuable cannabis flower that’s full of the cannabinoids that growers want. You won’t have to discard any male crops, helping you streamline and quicken the growing process.
If you purchase feminized seeds through our website, they’re guaranteed to be female or we’ll ship you replacements.

Growing Weed in Michigan

The Cannabis Seeds Michigan Residents Need
Now that we’ve covered Michigan’s growing climate and the benefits of buying your seeds online, which strains should you buy?
We offer a wide variety of cannabis seeds that are ideal for Michigan breeders. The three main types that you’ll find in our online store include:

Now, however, the rules have loosened a bit. The first state in the Midwest to approve recreational marijuana, Michigan is blazing new ground.
Legal Michigan residents who are at least 21 years old can possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana within their residence. If you’re willing to put in the work required to grow your own plants, you can possess even more.
The law allows residents to grow up to 12 plants inside of their residence. Alongside Alaska, Michigan is one of only two states in the country that allows this many plants. Most other states that have approved recreational marijuana only permit up to six plants.
The only caveats? The plants can’t be visible from a public place, and you must grow them inside of an enclosed area with locks or another functioning security device.

Let’s take a look at the details behind each type.

Having first introduced medical marijuana in November 2008, Michigan became the 10th US state and the first in the Midwest, to legalise recreational cannabis in the mid-term elections of November 2018 (those elections also saw Missouri and Utah adopt legalised medical cannabis laws).

Since cannabis has been legalized in Michigan, adults aged 21 years or older are legally permitted to possess the following:

Michigan Cannabis Law

Michigan’s recreational marijuana law, known as the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marijuana Act permitted the legal sale of cannabis from December 2019.

But what does this the new law mean for the great lakes states residents looking to grow their own cannabis seeds in Michigan? Let´s take a closer look at the recently implemented Michigan marijuana laws.

However, medical restrictions differ – Under the Michigan Medical Marijuana Act, qualifying patients suffering from a state-approved debilitating condition are permitted to possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis or cannabis equivalents.

Their first priority will be working with communities that want to prohibit marijuana businesses in their communities, which is allowed under the ballot proposal.

“I think the more limits put on this thing, the better,” Greenlee said. “We won’t oppose any limits.”

Depending on the strain and the growing conditions, a single marijuana plant can yield anywhere from 2 ounces to 2 pounds.

“Absolutely not — nothing is legal when it’s shipped across state lines,” said Barton Morris, a Royal Oak attorney specializing in the laws surrounding the marijuana industry.

But actual marijuana, along with the seeds and cannabis cuttings used for home grows, won’t be commercially available for sale until the state Department of Licensing and Regulation develops the rules governing the adult recreational market. And that won’t happen until probably early 2020.

While he said he’d love to see the Legislature take some action to limit home grows, the group hasn’t decided whether it will join that effort.

“The longer it takes the state to set up retail stores, the more people will be home growing,” said Matt Abel, executive director of the Michigan chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws or NORML. “I expect a rush on the grow stores in December because people are going to be getting lights and fans for Christmas.”