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from the seeds

To make the cocoa trees grow better, sow your seeds in small baskets or polyethylene bags.
These baskets or bags can be about 30 centimetres high and 20 centimetres wide.
Fill them with fine soil mixed with manure.
Put the baskets or bags in rows and leave a little path between the rows.

In each furrow, leave 25 centimetres between seeds.

Nursery bed for cocoa tree seedlings

SOWING SEEDS IN NURSERY BEDS OR IN BASKETS

choose the biggest pods from the trees which bear a lot of fruit.

If you want to have fine cocoa trees which produce a lot of big pods, you must choose carefully the seeds you are going to sow.

Young seedlings need a lot of water.
Water them every day.

Leave 25 centimetres between one furrow and the next.

Over the past 50 years, agricultural practices have changed dramatically, with technological advances allowing large-scale crop production. But while crop yields have increased, biodiversity has decreased to the point that now only about 30 crops provide 95% of human food-energy needs. Only 10% of the rice varieties that China used in the 1950s are still used today, for example. The U.S. has lost over 90% of its fruit and vegetable varieties since the 1900s. This monoculture nature of agriculture leaves food supplies more susceptible to threats such as diseases and drought.

In an age of heightened geopolitical tensions and uncertainty, the Svalbard vault is an unusual and hopeful exercise in international cooperation for the good of humankind. Any organization or country can send seeds to it, and there are no restrictions because of politics or the requirements of diplomacy. Red wooden boxes from North Korea sit alongside black boxes from the U.S. Over on the next aisle, boxes of seeds from Ukraine sit atop seeds from Russia. “The seeds don’t care that there are North Korean seeds and South Korean seeds in the same aisle,” Lainoff says. “They are cold and safe up there, and that’s all that really matters.”

Millions of these tiny brown specks, from more than 930,000 varieties of food crops, are stored in the Global Seed Vault on Spitsbergen, part of Norway’s Svalbard archipelago. It is essentially a huge safety deposit box, holding the world’s largest collection of agricultural biodiversity. “Inside this building is 13,000 years of agricultural history,” says Brian Lainoff, lead partnerships coordinator of the Crop Trust, which manages the vault, as he hauls open the huge steel door leading inside the mountain.

There are three vaults leading off from the chamber, but only one is currently in use, and its door is covered in a thick layer of ice, hinting at the subzero temperatures inside. In here, the seeds are stored in vacuum-packed silver packets and test tubes in large boxes that are neatly stacked on floor-to-ceiling shelves. They have very little monetary value, but the boxes potentially hold the keys to the future of global food security.

Deep in the bowels of an icy mountain on an island above the Arctic Circle between Norway and the North Pole lies a resource of vital importance for the future of human­kind. It’s not coal, oil or precious minerals, but seeds.

You don’t need to look far to discover the sacrifices made to keep these kernels of reproduction safe. One of the most historically significant deposits of seeds inside the vault comes from a collection in St. Petersburg’s Vavilov Research Institute, which originates from one of the first collections in the world. During the siege of Leningrad, about a dozen scientists barricaded themselves in the room containing the seeds in order to protect them from hungry citizens and the surrounding German army.

Near the entrance to the facility, a rectangular wedge of concrete that juts out starkly against the snowy landscape, the doomsday nickname seems eerily apt. It was precisely for its remoteness that Svalbard was chosen as the location of the vault. “It is away from the places on earth where you have war and terror, everything maybe you are afraid of in other places. It is situated in a safe place,” says Bente Naeverdal, a property manager who oversees the day-to-day operation of the vault.

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word ‘seed.’ Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 2

Definition of seed (Entry 2 of 2)

Do you cede or seed control?

Cede means “to yield or grant typically by treaty.” Most of the verb senses of seed are concerned with planting seeds (either literal, as of plants, or figuratively, as of ideas). However, the word may also be used to mean “to schedule (tournament players or teams) so that superior ones will not meet in early rounds.” If you relinquish or yield something you are ceding it, and if you are organizing the participants in a tournament you are seeding them.

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before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Middle English, from Old English sǣd; akin to Old High German sāt seed, Old English sāwan to sow — more at sow