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is ordering marijuana seeds legal

State law governs if and how you can operate your cannabis growing business, and each state takes a slightly different approach. Your state may offer a large number of permits with few prerequisites, a small number of permits with an extensive application process, or something in between.

How much you will pay for cannabis seeds depends on the strain of marijuana you buy. Typically, a pack of 10 or 12 seeds starts at around $40. You can expect to pay up to $500 for high-end strains. Again, it is important to only buy cannabis seeds from a legal and reputable seed bank or dispensary — and only if you know you are abiding by state law.

First and Foremost: Know Your State Laws

It is also an option to buy cannabis seeds online from an online seed bank and then have the seeds shipped to you, so long as you are abiding by state law. The risk here is that your package could still be confiscated. While it is unlikely that you would face criminal charges, there is no guarantee because of the way federal law treats marijuana products.

Thinking about starting your own cannabusiness? You are not alone. From CBD to medical marijuana to edibles, legal cannabis has become one of the fastest-growing industries in the United States, with few signs of slowing down any time soon.

If your business will include cannabis growing or cultivation, then you are probably wondering how to get your hands on weed seeds. legally. Before taking that step, though, make sure your business has the necessary license to operate legally in your state.

Spain: Spain has a similarly lenient policy as the UK. Residents can buy and sell seeds if they are for personal use in private areas.

Regular seeds come from one female and one male parent and there’s a 50/50 chance that the plant will be the feminized version that will produce buds. However, you have no control of the plant’s gender and there’s always a chance you’ll waste weeks growing, only to learn a male plant will not yield what you’re seeking.

Always buy from a reputable seed bank. The last thing you want is to buy what you think are feminized seeds, only to discover that they are regular seeds only capable of producing male plants.

Where to buy seeds

Cannabis seeds are not illegal in the European Union, and technically it’s not illegal to purchase seeds from another country. The Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, a 1962 framework for marijuana legalization, is an international treaty signed by 180 countries stating that marijuana is classified as an illegal substance, but it says nothing about seeds.

You should also make your purchase from a reputable seed bank capable of shipping to numerous states that understands the need for discretion. If the seeds are confiscated, most firms will either send a new package for free or refund your money.

The short answer? It’s complicated. Even if you live in California, where it is legal for adults to grow cannabis at home, and you purchase seeds from a California-based seed bank, your package can still be confiscated if mailed.

For that reason, you may want to seek the advice of an attorney well-versed in cannabis law to make sure you are protected when buying seeds.

So what exactly can Virginians do?

Not just consumers but Virginia as a whole. With regulations comes public safety, Pedini emphasized.

Vote wisely in November, said Pedini, and contact lawmakers and ask them to expedite access through Virginia’s already operational medical cannabis dispensaries.

What can Virginians do?

“It is illegal to transport any cannabis across any state lines,” answered Pedini.

Nearly 9,000 constituent contacts were sent to the legislature and administration urging legalization take place in 2021 and not be delayed until 2024 as proposed.

“No. There’s no way to buy it legally,” Pedini stated emphatically. “Unfortunately what Virginia failed to do in this piece of legislation is follow the same common sense pathway that states that have gone before us have done.”

Short answer: “Nowhere,” said Jenn Michelle Pedini, executive director of Virginia NORML and the national organization’s development director.