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smoking marijuana seeds bad

Marijuana seeds contain none of the psychoactive properties of cannabis, so if getting high is your main objective, ‘option B’ may have to be deployed. Not only are marijuana seeds devoid of THC, but smoking them along with the rest of your cannabis material will create a less than ideal flavour and aroma, and may cause a bit of a scare, as seeds tend to pop and crackle suddenly when exposed to extreme heat.

The overall consensus is that smoking marijuana seeds are not harmful to your health. If you want to know if you “can” smoke marijuana seeds, then the answer is yes, you can, but there is little to nothing to be gained from it.

When busting your bud up, take a moment to pick them out, and all should be well. That said, there’s no need to hit the panic button if the odd one sneaks past your initial scan and gets ingested.

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Long-term effects of smoking weed seeds are even worse! Marijuana seeds produce carcinogenic chemicals and toxins which can damage your respiratory system.

So you’ve talked yourself out of the horrible idea of smoking cannabis seeds and now you’re wondering what to do with them?

What to do with cannabis seeds?

Technically, you can crush cannabis seeds into a powdered form and try smoking them. However, does that mean you should? The short answer is no.

You can do it so long as you do your research, are responsible, and put in the due effort.

Marijuana seeds have little to no THC and CBD content which are the chemical compounds in marijuana flowers and buds that are responsible for having a mind-altering effect on you and getting you buzzed. Additionally, cannabis seeds create sharp crackling and popping sounds when they are smoked, which contributes to an incredibly uncomfortable smoking session. Plus, smoking cannabis seeds and stems will be harsh on your lungs and irritate the body’s airways, even if you are a chronic smoker.

More research is needed to know if secondhand marijuana smoke has similar health risks as secondhand tobacco smoke. A recent study on rats suggests that secondhand marijuana smoke can do as much damage to the heart and blood vessels as secondhand tobacco smoke. 20 But researchers haven’t fully explored the effect of secondhand marijuana smoke on humans. What they do know is that the toxins and tar found in marijuana smoke could affect vulnerable people, such as children or people with asthma.

People can mix marijuana in food (edibles), such as brownies, cookies, or candy, or brew it as a tea. A newly popular method of use is smoking or eating different forms of THC-rich resins (see “Marijuana Extracts”).

The popularity of edibles also increases the chance of harmful reactions. Edibles take longer to digest and produce a high. Therefore, people may consume more to feel the effects faster, leading to dangerous results.

Other Health Effects?

When a person smokes marijuana, THC quickly passes from the lungs into the bloodstream. The blood carries the chemical to the brain and other organs throughout the body. The body absorbs THC more slowly when the person eats or drinks it. In that case, they generally feel the effects after 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Long-term marijuana use has been linked to mental illness in some people, such as:

Although these findings support the idea of marijuana as a “gateway drug,” the majority of people who use marijuana don’t go on to use other “harder” drugs. It’s also important to note that other factors besides biological mechanisms, such as a person’s social environment, are also critical in a person’s risk for drug use and addiction. Read more about marijuana as a gateway drug in our Marijuana Research Report.

Marijuana use can lead to the development of a substance use disorder, a medical illness in which the person is unable to stop using even though it’s causing health and social problems in their life. Severe substance use disorders are also known as addiction. Research suggests that between 9 and 30 percent of those who use marijuana may develop some degree of marijuana use disorder. 25 People who begin using marijuana before age 18 are four to seven times more likely than adults to develop a marijuana use disorder. 26